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What is Body Dysmorphia

Self Care


Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a mental health condition characterized by an obsessive preoccupation with a perceived flaw in one's appearance. People with BDD may spend a significant amount of time thinking about their appearance, comparing themselves to others, and trying to hide or fix their perceived flaw. This preoccupation can interfere with daily functioning and can lead to significant distress and impairment in quality of life.


BDD is often accompanied by other mental health conditions, such as anxiety and depression. If you think you or someone you know may be experiencing BDD, it is important to seek help from a mental health professional. Treatment may include therapy, medication, or a combination of both.


People with BDD may have a distorted view of how they look and may spend a lot of time comparing their appearance to others. They may also engage in repetitive behaviors, such as mirror checking or skin picking, in an attempt to fix their perceived flaws.

Symptoms of BDD can vary, but may include:

  • Excessive concern about a specific body part or features, such as the nose, skin, or hair
  • Believing that you are ugly or deformed, even when others tell you that you are not
  • Engaging in repetitive behaviors, such as mirror checking or skin picking
  • Seeking reassurance from others about your appearance
  • Avoiding social situations or activities due to concerns about your appearance
  • Difficulty concentrating or completing tasks due to preoccupation with appearance
  • Excessive grooming or appearance checking behaviors
  • Constantly seeking reassurance about one's appearance
  • Believing that others are overly focused on their appearance or perceived flaw
  • Avoiding social situations or activities because of a fear of being judged based on their appearance
  • Engaging in repetitive behaviors such as skin picking or hair pulling


BDD can have a significant impact on a person's quality of life, as it can cause social isolation, difficulties at work or school, and low self-esteem. If you are experiencing symptoms of BDD, it is important to seek help from a mental health professional. Treatment for BDD may include cognitive-behavioral therapy, medication, or a combination of both.